Friday, September 17, 2010

SAT Word Power = Vocab. Cartoons (review)

Vocabulary Cartoons: SAT Word Power, published by New Monic Books, Inc., is an innovative way to remember tricky words. I don’t know about your kids, but mine sometimes get tired of stuff that’s officially called “schoolwork.” So, when this paperback book came in the mail, they thought it was “cool” and fought over who would get to look at it first. “Vocabulary Cartoons are mnemonics designed for learning new words.” I’ve heard that using fun memory aids such as these is the best way to remember facts, and I think it’s true (but I’ll let you know for sure when my oldest takes the ACT again this spring).

Teens will enjoy flipping through the 343-page book at random and laughing at the silly cartoons. Hint: you could stash it on top of the toilet for captive audiences. While it’s targeted at students preparing to take the SAT exam (grades 10­–12), students as young as middle school will enjoy looking at it as well. Who knows, they may even learn a few new words along the way!

Every 10 words or so there’s a review with matching and fill-in-the-blank questions. This way, you can ensure that your teens are retaining all these nifty new words that they’re learning. Besides, even though it’s a fun format, they’re learning the words to use on the SAT (or ACT or PSAT) test, so they may as well get used to being tested on them.

We loved it and would definitely recommend it for high school students. It’s $12.95 and can be purchased here.

New Monics also publishes a second SAT vocabulary book and an elementary edition, and A Picture Speller for Young Writers.

For more opinions and reviews, check out the official TOS Review Crew blog @ http://homeschoolblogger.com/homeschoolcrew/783022/ 


Disclosure: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”